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Redentore Venice

An authentic celebration in Venice belonged to the Venetian people.

There is a very special day in Venice life: the 3rd Sunday of July. On that day, Venetians celebrate the biggest and most crowdy day ever: Redentore‘s Day.

In the beginning, Redentore was a very important religious day established at the end of the XVI century. The plague terribly hit the Laguna but, the city, somehow, survived. For this reason authorities decided to thank God for giving Venice another chance to live and they ordered the construction of a wonderful church: Chiesa del Redentore.

What does it happen on that day?

Both on Saturday and Sunday normally there is a very significative procession of wooden boats to the Church. Boats form in that way a sort of floating bridge in Laguna, allowing people without boats to join the Church on foot.

Many tourists loose the opportunity to attend this evocative and silent part of Redentore‘s Day but, in my opinion, is one of the best expression of belonging to Venice.

After the mass the popular celebration starts, transforming Canal Grande and many other parts of Laguna into a huge party till the morning after.

It is a common habit to prepare something to eat at home as ‘Sarde in Saor‘, a typical Venetian dish. That night people do not eat at home, but they take dinner to their own boat and eat on the water with friends and family.

At midnight there are wonderful fireworks on Canal Grande and, after them, young people are used to join Lido, that part of Venice where the Film Festival takes place. Lido has wonderful beaches and on that night they are plenty of dj sets and parties.

As far as I’m concerned, Redentore is one of the day that belongs only to real Venetian people. Its deep meaning is to stay together and celebrate a city that is so fragile, so wonderful. A place that sometimes forgets to have its own inhabitants and owners.

Eleonora

I'm a Italy lover, mom of two, living in central Italy and I love travelling. I have a degree in Tourism economics and management and now I'm a consultant helping businesses working in tourism.

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